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Welcome to the 5th grade SMART Pages! Find information on what your child is learning, vocabulary, activities for home, and learning links!

1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter
  • Operations and Algebraic Thinking
  • Numbers and Operations in Base Ten
  • Numbers and Operations in Base Ten
  • Numbers and Operations- Fractions
  • Geometry
  • Measurement & Data
  • Operations and Algebraic Thinking
  • Geometry
  • Measurement & Data
  • Order of Operations
  • Whole Numbers and Decimals
  • Multiplication and Division of Decimals
  • Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying, and Dividing Fractions
  • Geometry and the Coordinate Plan
  • 2D Figures
  • Volume & Measurement
  • Show what you know!
Operations & Algebraic Thinking

What Your Child Will Learn

Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators, including mixed numbers (5.NF.1) Quarter 2 and 4
Solve addition and subtraction word problems with fractions (5.NF.2) Quarter 2 and 4
Solve word problems, understanding that fractions can also be a representation of a division problem whereas the denominator needs to be divided into a numerator (a/b = a ÷ b) (5.NF.3)
• Interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (for example, interpret 3/4 as the result of dividing 3 by 4)
• Divide fractions to solve word problems (for example, For example, 3 wholes are shared equally among 4 people each person has a share of size ¾)
Quarter 2 and 4
Multiply a fraction by a whole number and other fractions (5.NF.4) Quarter 2 and 4
Understand the relationship between the size of the product and the size of the factors (5.NF.5) Quarter 2 and 4
Multiply fractions to solve word problems (5.NF.6) Quarter 2 and 4

Vocabulary


  • Denominator: The number below the line in the fraction. The denominator represents the number of equal pieces the whole is broken into
  • Mixed Number: A number that is made up of a whole number and a fraction
  • Numerator: The number above the line in a fraction. The numerator represents how many pieces of the whole, or how many parts of a set, that are discussed
  • Product: The result (answer) of multiplying a set of numbers together
  • Factor: A number that is multiplied by another (factor x factor = product)
  • Equivalent Fractions: Two or more fractions with the same value. Example: 1/2 = 2/4
  • Improper Fractions: A fraction where the numerator is greater than the denominator.

Activities At Home

  • Create or pick numbers to make fractions. Add, subtract, or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set.
  • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking.
  • Identify the use of decimals in sporting events and in newspapers.
  • Draw different shapes. Divide them into different fractions.
  • Practice multiplication and division facts.

Learning Links


Dirt Bike Comparing Fractions
Fraction Models  Fraction of a Number  Fraction Manor
Triplets  Fraction Balance Scale  Fraction Bars  Modeling Tool
Fraction Balance Scale
Thinking Blocks
Bridge Builders
Clara's Fraction
Numbers & Operations in Base Ten

What Your Child Will Learn

Understand multi-digit place value (5.NBT.1) Quarter 1,2
Multiply and divide by powers of 10 (5.NBT.2) Quarter 1,2
Read, write and compare decimals to the thousandths (5.NBT.3) Quarter 1,2
Round decimals to any place (5.NBT.4) Quarter 1,2
Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm (5.NBT.5) Quarter 1,2
Divide multi-digit numbers (5.NBT.6) Quarter 1,2
Add, subtract, multiply and divide decimals to the hundredths (5.NBT.7) Quarter 1,2

Vocabulary

  • Decimal: A number that uses place value and a decimal point to show values less than one, such as tenths and hundredths
  • Place Value: The value of a digit in a number
  • Standard Algorithm: A way of setting out a step-by-step mathematical procedure
  • Rounding: To find the nearest ten, hundred, or thousand (and so on). For example, 391 rounds up to 400 and 331 rounds down to 300
  • Digit: A symbol used to show a number
  • Power of 10: When one of the factors is a multiple of ten, you can use place value patterns and basic facts to find the product
  • Product: The result (answer) of multiplying a set of numbers together.
  • Quotient: The result (answer) of dividing two numbers.
  • Estimate: To find a number close to an exact amount.
  • Operations: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Division

Activities At Home

  • Create number cubes or spinners and have the student identify the place value and value of different digits in that number.
  • Roll or pick numbers to create decimals. Add, subtract, multiply, or divide the decimals.
  • Find the batting averages or other statistics in the sports section of a newspaper and add or subtract the statistics.
  • Estimate and find the sums and differences of items at the store and in restaurants.
  • Practice basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts.
  • Roll or pick numbers to create decimals. Compare and order the numbers.
  • Choose a four-digit number. Multiply and divide by powers of 10 (10, 100, 1,000, etc.) by moving the decimal point left or right as appropriate.

Learning Links


Break the Code
2 Digit Multiplication
Calculator Chaos
Equivalent Numbers
Base Ten Blocks
Finding Numbers on a Hundreds Chart
Place Value
Puppy Pull Decimals
Number Puzzles
Interactive Number Line Hungry Puppies
Place Value Pirates
Grand SlamBase Ten Blocks Base Ten Blocks  Decimals of the Carribean  Hundred Chart
Numbers in Operations in Fractions

What Your Child Will Learn

Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators, including mixed numbers (5.NF.1) Quarter 1,2
Solve addition and subtraction word problems with fractions (5.NF.2) Quarter 1,2
Solve word problems, understanding that fractions can also be a representation of a division problem whereas the denominator needs to be divided into a numerator (a/b = a ÷ b) (5.NF.3)
• Interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (for example, interpret 3/4 as the result of dividing 3 by 4)
• Divide fractions to solve word problems (for example, For example, 3 wholes are shared equally among 4 people each person has a share of size ¾)
Quarter 1,2
Multiply a fraction by a whole number and other fractions (5.NF.4) Quarter 3,4
Understand the relationship between the size of the product and the size of the factors (5.NF.5) Quarter 3,4
Multiply fractions to solve word problems (5.NF.6) Quarter 3,4

Vocabulary


  • Denominator: The number below the line in the fraction. The denominator represents the number of equal pieces the whole is broken into
  • Mixed Number: A number that is made up of a whole number and a fraction
  • Numerator: The number above the line in a fraction. The numerator represents how many pieces of the whole, or how many parts of a set, that are discussed
  • Product: The result (answer) of multiplying a set of numbers together
  • Factor: A number that is multiplied by another (factor x factor = product)
  • Equivalent Fractions: Two or more fractions with the same value. Example: 1/2 = 2/4
  • Improper Fractions: A fraction where the numerator is greater than the denominator.

Activities At Home

  • Create or pick numbers to make fractions. Add, subtract, or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set.
  • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking.
  • Identify the use of decimals in sporting events and in newspapers.
  • Draw different shapes. Divide them into different fractions.
  • Practice multiplication and division facts.

Learning Links


Dirt Bike Comparing Fractions  Fraction Models  Fraction of a Number  Fraction Manor
Triplets  Fraction Balance Scale  Fraction Bars  Modeling Tool
Fraction Balance Scale  Thinking Blocks  Bridge Builders  Clara's Fraction
Geometry

What Your Child Will Learn

Graph ordered pairs (5.G.1) Quarter 3
Graph ordered pairs to solve problems (5.G.2) Quarter 3
Understand sub-categories of two-dimensional figures (5.G.3) Quarter 3
Classify two-dimensional figures based on attributes (5.G.4) Quarter 3

Vocabulary

  • Order Pairs: A pair of numbers where order is important, for example, (4,6) is different to (6,4). Often used to indicate on a coordinate plane, graph or map.
  • Coordinate Plane: A plane containing two perpendicular axes (x and y) intersecting at a point called the origin (0,0).
  • Two-Dimensional: A measure in two directions, such as length and width.
  • Angles: The figure formed when two rays or line segments share the same endpoint.
  • Point: An exact position or location.
  • Line: A straight path extending in both directions with no endpoints.
  • Line Segment: A part of a line that includes two points, called endpoints, and all the points between them.
  • Perpendicular Lines: Lines that intersect to form right angles.
  • Parallel Lines: Lines in a plane that never intersect.
  • Base: A side of a polygon or a face of a solid figure by which the figure is measured or named.
  • Quadrilateral: A polygon with four sides.
  • Parallelogram: A quadrilateral (4-sided figure) that has both pairs of opposite sides equal and parallel. Example: all rhombi, (plural for rhombus). Squares and rectangles are parallelograms.
  • Regular Polygons: A polygon that has all equal sides or equal angles.
  • Irregular Polygons: A polygon that does not have all sides equal or all angles equal.
  • Rectangle: A quadrilateral with four right angles and two pairs or opposite equal parallel sides.
  • Square: A quadrilateral with four equal sides and four right angles, opposite sides that are parallel, two diagonals that bisect at right angles, and four lines of symmetry.
  • Triangle: A polygon with three angles and three sides.
  • Rhombus: A parallelogram with four equal sides and equal opposite angles.
  • Trapezoid: A quadrilateral with one pair of parallel sides.

Activities At Home

  • Name two-dimensional figures and find examples at home.
  • Draw different polygons within a piece of triangle grid paper, or use combinations of triangles to create other polygons.
  • Make flash cards of different geometric figures and their properties.
  • Identify, describe, and different household objects as two-dimensional figures.
  • Use a compass or a computer to draw geometric figures.

Learning Links


2D Concentration Game  Angles 3D Boxes  Maze Game
Geometric Solids  Types of Angles Locate the Aliens  Space Boy Rescue
Measurement & Data

What Your Child Will Learn

Convert measurements using like units and use these conversions in multi-step word problems (5.MD.1) Quarter 3,4
Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (5.MD.2) Quarter 3,4
Understand the concept of volume as a measurement of solid and liquid objects
(5.MD.3)
Quarter 3,4
Find volume using the formula (5.NBT.4) Quarter 3,4
Add and multiply to solve volume problems (5.NBT.5) Quarter 3,4

Vocabulary


  • Volume: The amount of space that a three-dimensional figure contains. Volume is expressed in cubic units, (how many small cubes would fit inside a solid figure).
  • Three-Dimensional Figure: A measure in three directions, such as length and width.
  • Line Plot: A number line long enough to encompass all numbers in the sample, showing a dot or mark over the position corresponding to each number.
  • Mass: A measure of how much matter is in an object.
  • Capacity: How much liquid a container can hold (see volume).
  • Rectangular Prism: A prism with two identical, rectangular bases.
  • Rectangle: A quadrilateral with four right angles and two pairs of opposite equal parallel sides.
  • Right Prism: A solid three-dimensional with two identical, parallel bases. All other faces are rectangles.
  • Base: A side of a polygon or a face of a solid figure by which the figure is measured or named.

Activities At Home

  • Make flash cards of different geometric figures and their properties.
  • Identify different plane and solid figures in your environment.
  • Find the volume of real-world objects in your home.
  • Make nets for different solid figures using graph paper. Compare nets that work to nets that do not fold correctly to make the figures.
  • Compare the estimated volume of a carton or bottle of liquid (such as 1/2 gallon juice or milk or two liter bottle of lemonade) in cubic inches or centimeters to its stated volume in ounces or milliliters.

Learning Links


Maximum Capacity
Matching Math Minecraft Volume Matching Math
Create a Graph